Program Schedule: Day 2

Thursday, June 12th

Time

Topics

Faculty

Learning Objectives

7:00AM - 8:00AM Registration    
8:00AM - 8:30AM

Exercise Associated Collapse

  • Emergency evaluation
  • Differential diagnosis (venous pooling, cardiac, hyponatremia [other electrolyte disorders], dehydration, environmental illness, other medical condition [diabetes, etc])
  • Treatment (environmental illness and cardiac are discussed in other lectures)

Brian Krabak, MD

  1. Create an algorithm to evaluate athletes with exercise associated collapse.
  2. Summarize the current treatment recommendations for exercise associated hyponatremia
  3. Describe how to prevent venous pooling in an athlete after the athlete crosses the finish line.
8:30AM - 9:20AM

Shoulder Injuries and Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Fractures
      • Clavicle
      • Glenoid
      • Humerus
      • Scapula
      • Stress fractures
    • Dislocation/Subluxation
      • Acromioclavicular joint
      • Glenohumeral joint
    • Instability, chronic
      • Anterior
      • Posterior
      • Multi-directional
    • Muscle/tendon injuries
      • Biceps tendon, proximal
      • Pectoralis major
      • Rotator cuff
    • Labral tears
    • Adhesive capsulitis
    • Impingement
      • External (primary and secondary)
      • Internal

Mederic Hall, MD

  1. Summarize the key anatomical landmarks and structures of the shoulder that are commonly involved in sports related injuries.
  2. Explain the etiology and epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries of the shoulder and clavicle as they relate to the injured athlete.
  3. Implement the appropriate diagnostic evaluation for traumatic and overuse injuries of the upper extremity in athletes.
  4. Create a treatment plan for the athlete with the injured shoulder.
  5. Discuss the epidemiology evaluation and treatment of neurovascular injuries of the shoulder in the injured athlete.
9:20AM - 10:00AM

Elbow and Forearm Injuries & Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Fracture
      • Radial head
      • Supracondylar
      • Olecranon
      • Radius/ulna midshaft
    • Dislocation
    • Instability/ligament injury
      • Ulnar collateral ligament injury
      • Posterolateral instability (lateral ulnar collateral ligament injury)
    • Valgus extension overload
    • Muscle/Tendon injury
      • Distal biceps rupture
      • Lateral epicondylitis
      • Medial epicondylitis
      • Triceps tendinitis
    • Olecranon bursitis
    • Acute compartment syndrome

Brian Krabak, MD

  • Summarize the key anatomical landmarks and structures of the elbow and forearm that are commonly involved in sports related injuries.
  • Explain the etiology and epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries of the elbow and forearm as they relate to the injured athlete.
  • Implement the appropriate diagnostic evaluation for traumatic and overuse injuries of the elbow and forearm in athletes.
  • Create a treatment plan for the athlete with the injured elbow and forearm.
  • Discuss the epidemiology evaluation and treatment of neurovascular injuries of the elbow and forearm in the injured athlete.
10:00AM - 10:10AM Question & Answer Brian Krabak, MD

Mederic Hall, MD
 
10:20AM - 11:05AM

Wrist and Hand Injuries & Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Fractures
      • Carpal
      • Metacarpal
      • Distal ulna
      • Distal radius
      • Phalangeal
      • Volar plate
    • Dislocations
      • Lunate
      • Perilunate
      • Distal radioulnar joint
      • MCP
      • PIP
      • DIP
    • Instability/Ligament injury
      • Scapholunate/Dorsal intercalated segmental instability
      • Lunotriquetral/Volar intercalated segmental instability
      • 1st MCP ulnar collateral ligament
    • Muscle/Tendon injury
      • Intersection syndrome
      • Jersey finger
      • Mallet finger
      • DeQuervain’s tenosynovitis
      • Trigger finger
      • Boutonniere deformity
    • TFCC injury
    • Nail bed injuries
    • Ganglion cysts
Mederic Hall, MD
  1. Explain the key anatomical landmarks and structures of the hand and wrist that are commonly involved in sports related injuries.
  2. Discuss the etiology and epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries of the wrist and hand as they relate to the injured athlete.
  3. Implement the appropriate diagnostic evaluation for traumatic and overuse injuries of the wrist and hand in athletes.
  4. Create a treatment plan for the athlete with the injured wrist and hand.
  5. Summarize the epidemiology evaluation and treatment of neurovascular injuries of the wrist and hand in the injured athlete.
  6. Describe injury mechanisms and anatomical involvement in tendon injuries of the wrist and hand.
11:05AM - 11:50AM

Pediatric Musculoskeletal Injuries & Conditions

  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Salter Harris fractures
    • Apophyseal/epiphyseal avulsion fractures
      • Medial epicondyle
      • ASIS/AIIS
      • Ischium
      • Tibial tuberosity
      • Lesser trochanter
      • Inferior pole patella
      • Distal radius
    • Apophysitis/epiphysitis
      • Little leaguer’s elbow
      • Little leaguer’s shoulder
      • Osgood-Schlatter disease
      • Sever’s disease
      • Sinding-Larsen-Johannson disease
      • Iselin’s disease
      • Ischium
      • Ilium
      • Navicular
      • Subcapital
    • Osteochondritis dessicans
      • Femoral head
      • Capitellum
      • Femoral condyle
      • Talus
      • Patella
    • Osteonecrosis
      • Calve’s disease
      • Freiberg’s disease
      • Kienbock’s disease
      • Kohler’s disease
      • Legg-Calve-Perthes disease
      • Panner’s disease
      • Scheuermann’s disease
    • Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

Brian Krabak, MD

  1. Summarize the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Salter Harris fractures and apophyseal/epiphyseal avulsion fractures in the pediatric population participating in sports.
  2. Explain the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of apophysitis/epiphysitis and osteochondritis dessicans in the pediatric population.
  3. Discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of osteonecrosis in the pediatric athlete population.
  4. Summarize the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of slipped capital epiphysis in the pediatric population.
11:50AM - 12:00PM Question & Answer

Mederic Hall, MD

Brian Krabak, MD

 
1:00PM - 1:45PM

Pelvis, Hip and Thigh Injuries & Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Fractures
      • Femoral neck stress fracture
      • Femoral shaft stress fracture (include discussion of fat embolism)
      • Pubic ramus stress fracture
      • Sacral stress fracture
      • Femoral shaft stress fracture
      • Femoral shaft fracture
    • Dislocation
      • Hip
    • Muscle/Tendon injuries
      • Hip flexor
      • Piriformis
      • Quadriceps contusion/strain/myositis
      • Hamstring
      • Iliotibial band
      • Adductor
    • Bursitis
      • Greater trochanteric
      • Iliopectineal
      • Ischial
    • Athletic pubalgia
    • Labral injuries
    • Osteitis pubis
    • Avascular necrosis
    • Degenerative joint disease
    • Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh
Mederic Hall, MD
  1. Discuss the key anatomical landmarks and structures of the hip, thigh, and pelvis that are commonly involved in sports related injuries.
  2. Explain the etiology and epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries of the hip, thigh, and pelvis as they relate to the injured athlete.
  3. Implement the appropriate diagnostic evaluation for traumatic and overuse injuries of the hip, thigh, and pelvis in athletes.
  4. Create a treatment plan for the athlete with the injured hip thigh and pelvis.
  5. Discuss the epidemiology evaluation and treatment of neurovascular injuries of the wrist and hand in the injured athlete.
  6. Summarize injury mechanisms, diagnostic evaluation and treatment of stress fracture involving the pelvis, hip, and femur.
1:45PM - 2:45PM

Knee Injuries & Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Fractures
      • Patella
      • Tibial plateau
      • Segond
      • Stress fracture
    • Dislocation
      • Patella
      • Knee
    • Muscle/tendon injuries
      • Iliotibial band
      • Patellar tendinitis
      • Popliteus tendinitis
      • Extensor mechanism rupture
    • Instability/ligament injuries
      • Anterior cruciate ligament
      • Posterior cruciate ligament
      • Medial collateral ligament
      • Lateral collateral ligament
      • Posterolateral corner
      • Patellar subluxation
    • Patellofemoral dysfunction
      • Plica syndrome
      • Fat pad impingement
      • Anterior knee pain
    • Meniscal tears/cysts
    • Degenerative joint disease
    • Bursitis
      • Prepatellar
      • Pes anserine
      • Voschel’s
Brian Krabak, MD
  1. Summarize the key anatomical landmarks and structures of the knee that are commonly involved in sports related injuries.
  2. Discuss the etiology and epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries of the knee as they relate to the injured athlete.
  3. Implement the appropriate diagnostic evaluation for traumatic and overuse injuries of the knee in athletes.
  4. Create a treatment plan for the athlete with the injured knee.
  5. Discuss the epidemiology evaluation and treatment of neurovascular injuries of the knee in the injured athlete.
  6. Explain injury mechanisms, diagnostic evaluation and treatment of muscle and tendon overuse injuries involving the knee in the injured athlete.
2:45PM - 3:00PM Question & Answer

Mederic Hall, MD

Brian Krabak, MD

 
3:15PM - 4:05PM

Leg, Ankle, and Foot Injuries & Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Fractures
      • Fibula
      • Tibia
      • Ankle (Talus, tibia, malleolae)
      • Tarsals
      • Metatarsals
      • Phalangeal
      • Os trigonum
    • Stress fractures
      • Fibula
      • Tibia
      • Navicular
      • Calcaneus
      • Metatarsal
      • Sesamoid
    • Dislocations
      • Fibular head
      • Ankle
      • Interphalangeal
    • Muscle/tendon injury
      • Gastrocnemius tear
      • Achilles tendinitis/tear
      • Posterior tibialis
      • Peroneal tendinitis/subluxation
      • Plantar fasciitis
      • Anterior tibialis
      • Flexor hallucis longus
    • Ligament injury/instability
      • Lateral ankle sprain
      • Medial ankle sprain
      • Syndesmosis sprain
      • Chronic instability of the ankle
      • Lisfranc
      • Turf toe
    • Medial tibial stress syndrome
    • Acute compartment syndrome
    • Chronic exertional compartment syndrome
    • Bursitis
      • Retro-achilles
      • Retro-calcaneal
    • Tarsal coalition
    • Ingrown Toenails
Mederic Hall, MD
  1. Summarize the key anatomical landmarks and structures of the leg, ankle and foot that are commonly involved in sports related injuries.
  2. Discuss the etiology and epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries of the leg, ankle, and foot as they relate to the injured athlete.
  3. Implement the appropriate diagnostic evaluation for traumatic and overuse injuries of the leg, ankle, and foot in athletes.
  4. Create a treatment plan for the athlete with the injured leg, ankle, and foot.
  5. Discuss the epidemiology evaluation and treatment of neurovascular injuries of the leg, ankle, and foot in the injured athlete.
  6. Explain injury mechanisms, diagnostic evaluation and treatment of muscle and tendon overuse injuries involving the leg, ankle, and foot in the injured athlete.
  7. Define tarsal coalition.
  8. Outline a treatment program for an ingrown toenail.
4:05PM - 4:35PM

Eye Injuries & Conditions

  • Anatomy
  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
    • Eye
      • Corneal abrasion
      • Foreign body
      • Hyphema
      • Retinal detachment
      • Vitreous hemorrhage
      • Penetrating injury
Brian Desmond, MD
  1. Categorize sports into high and low risk groups for eye injuries.
  2. Explain the signs and symptoms of significant eye injury.
  3. Describe the sideline management of common eye injuries.
4:35PM - 5:05PM

Sports Endocrinology

  • Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment
  • Diabetes Mellitus
      • Type 1
      • Type 2
  • Menstrual disorders
  • Osteoporosis/Osteopenia (female athlete triad will be discussed elsewhere)
Chad Asplund, MD
  1. Recommend the appropriate insulin adjustments for a Type 1 diabetic who is beginning an exercise program.
  2. Explain the benefits of exercise in diabetics.
  3. Identify the athlete at risk for menstrual disorders.
5:05PM - 5:15PM Question & Answer Mederic Hall, MD

Chad Asplund, MD

Brian Desmond, MD
 
5:15PM - 5:30PM Test Questions from the Day’s Topics